Tag Archives: student-centered learning

Online Learning: A Middle School Student’s Perspective

Boring Traditional Class

As people (ed tech investors perhaps?) praise K-12 schools that require students to take at least one course online, I am left wondering, who really benefits from this… Maybe one day soon, online courses will be engaging and superior to an outstanding classroom-based experience, but I have yet to see one that is any better than the traditional classes being taught by routinized teachers.

If only the online course designers were building off a student-centered, problem-based, interesting class model instead of the ‘sage on a stage’, monkey-see-monkey-regurgitate-on-assessments model depicted at right.

During the 2011-2012 school year, 8th grader, David Kang Myung Yang, learned pre-calculus through a self-paced, online course offered by Thinkwell.

An enthusiastic and brilliant Williams College professor doled out mini-lectures accompanied by animations and graphics.  The ‘class’ included a variety of practice problems, self-assessments, graded assessments and review activities.

Here’s David’s views on the experience:

Since my school was not able to create a block for a one-on-one math class, I took an online pre-calculus course. The online class was pretty good and included several mathematical problems and a well-categorized system that was helpful when you needed to find a specific theorem or information.

However, several parts of the program were disappointing. First, the program sometimes skipped some proofs of a theorem. Also, I was not able to ask questions at the moment when I had one. Another thing I missed while taking the online program was that I was not able to have a class with other students where we would discuss about a question together and talk about their ideas on the problem.

How the class always started with a man explaining theorems on a monitor screen made math class boring compared to a lively classroom. Also, most questions in the program were just a direct application of a theorem which made problem solving unappealing compared to a hard and complicated math problem that requires a lot more thinking than just applying a theorem directly. 

What’s cool in schools?

Students at High Tech Middle San DiegoThe kids.  Definitely.  Have you ever heard, “That is a great school, fantastic program, but the kids…eh, horrible, really what a terrible bunch” ?

A school is only as great as its students.  Beautiful building, top-of-the-line technology, every curricular resource imaginable, teachers with master’s degrees and credentials… all add up to nothing if kids are bored, not learning, and counting the minutes until they are ‘free’ from school grounds.

In this blog, I’m taking it as a given that the kids are the coolest part of the school. Therefore, I consider a ‘cool school’ one which recognizes this fact and puts student needs front and center. In other words, a ‘cool school’ strives to provide engaging learning experiences and a healthy community designed to bring out the best in the kids. And by ‘best’ I mean, achievement on the standardized tests tax payers have been spending millions on, and also visible signs that students are developing and exhibiting qualities we know are truly valuable – curiosity, thoughtfulness, responsibility, focus, creativity, perseverance, discipline, grit.

In this blog, I hope to highlight those places – an entire school, a single school component, a particular class, or a moment in time – worthy of an Academy Award in creating these types of learning environments.

If you know of any cool schools, please send that info my way.