Category Archives: Blended Learning

Online Learning: A Middle School Student’s Perspective

Boring Traditional Class

As people (ed tech investors perhaps?) praise K-12 schools that require students to take at least one course online, I am left wondering, who really benefits from this… Maybe one day soon, online courses will be engaging and superior to an outstanding classroom-based experience, but I have yet to see one that is any better than the traditional classes being taught by routinized teachers.

If only the online course designers were building off a student-centered, problem-based, interesting class model instead of the ‘sage on a stage’, monkey-see-monkey-regurgitate-on-assessments model depicted at right.

During the 2011-2012 school year, 8th grader, David Kang Myung Yang, learned pre-calculus through a self-paced, online course offered by Thinkwell.

An enthusiastic and brilliant Williams College professor doled out mini-lectures accompanied by animations and graphics.  The ‘class’ included a variety of practice problems, self-assessments, graded assessments and review activities.

Here’s David’s views on the experience:

Since my school was not able to create a block for a one-on-one math class, I took an online pre-calculus course. The online class was pretty good and included several mathematical problems and a well-categorized system that was helpful when you needed to find a specific theorem or information.

However, several parts of the program were disappointing. First, the program sometimes skipped some proofs of a theorem. Also, I was not able to ask questions at the moment when I had one. Another thing I missed while taking the online program was that I was not able to have a class with other students where we would discuss about a question together and talk about their ideas on the problem.

How the class always started with a man explaining theorems on a monitor screen made math class boring compared to a lively classroom. Also, most questions in the program were just a direct application of a theorem which made problem solving unappealing compared to a hard and complicated math problem that requires a lot more thinking than just applying a theorem directly.